New York Drivers Need to Keep Cool Heads Following Superstorm Sandy

Just days after one the largest storms to ever hit New York caused billions of dollars in damage, rescuers are still learning just how much destruction was left in Sandy's wake.

Adding to the frustrations of New Yorkers is the fact that many are still without electricity and finding gasoline is becoming increasingly difficult. If fact, it has become common to see queues near functioning gas stations stretching for many blocks.

In many places, police have been needed to keep tempers from flaring out of control - with one man in Queens being charged after threatening another motorist with a gun because of a dispute stemming from cars cutting in line for gas.

New York City drivers need cool heads to prevail so that needless injuries do not occur. When drivers let their emotions get the better of them, accidents happen. After all, even when not dealing with such dire circumstances, drivers can easily find themselves in precarious situations - as illustrated by a fatal hit-and-run accident in Queens that left an elderly man dead just days before Sandy struck.

Recent NYC Pedestrian Accident

According to the New York Daily News, the recent pedestrian accident occurred when the 76-year-old man was walking on a sidewalk along Booth Memorial Ave. As the man was walking, an SUV struck him - sending the elderly man into a wooded area near the sidewalk.

Following the accident, the driver of the SUV allegedly jumped out of his vehicle and ran down 164 th street, although he was apprehended by police later at his residence. Tragically, the elderly man died before emergency personnel were able to find him.

Unfortunately, this is just one of the recent pedestrian accidents in a seemingly endless list here in New York. According to information from the New York State DMV, there were nearly 5,000 pedestrian/motor vehicle accidents reported to police that resulted in either death or serious to moderate injuries in 2011. Of these, the New York Times recently reported that roughly 3,000 nonfatal accidents happened in New York City alone - with only 2 percent of those actually being investigated by the NYC's Police Department's Accident Investigation Squad.

According to the New York Times, the Investigation Squad generally only investigates accidents when the victim is "considered likely to die" - which means that many injured victims may not receive a thorough investigation by the squad.

Consequently, many victims in pedestrian/motor vehicle accidents need to be proactive in collecting their own evidence following an accident. Failure to do so may lead to difficulty later when attempting to show liability. It is advisable to speak with an experienced pedestrian accident attorney following an accident as they can assist with preserving important evidence and protecting your rights.