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Motorcyclists Loses Control of Bike, Kills Passenger

| Jan 26, 2015 | Motor Vehicle Accidents

A tragic motorcycle accident in New York recently showcased the danger to passengers on these high-speed bikes as well. Police responded to emergency calls in the early morning hours last October near the 17th Street and Third Avenue intersection of the Gowanus Expressway only to find that both individuals involved were beyond saving. Police say that the driver, 30-year old Jose Chevere, and passenger 24-year old Jalissa Otero, were thrown from the bike when Chevere lost control. Both individuals fell approximately 35 feet onto 17th Street below.

An investigation into the accident found that the Kawasaki motorcycle struck a concrete barrier on the overpass before rocketing over the railing and plummeting to the pavement below, taking both the driver and the passenger with it.

As tragic as this accident is for the family of the driver, for the family of the passenger it is even more so. She wasn’t in control of the bike at the time of the crash-just a passive participant.

While the police aren’t expected to file any criminal charges in the case, an investigation could reveal Jose Chevere to be at fault for poor Jalissa Otero’s death.

A New York motorcycle accident attorney could potentially prove that her death was directly related to Chevere’s actions (if he was showboating or driving at excessive speeds) making his estate financially responsible for any medical expenses, funeral costs, and pain and suffering for the time Otero survived and what she would have contributed financially to her family over her lifetime.

If you have been injured or lost a loved one to a motorcycle accident and feel that another individual’s actions (or inactions) led directly to their death, please contact a qualified New York City motorcycle accident attorney immediately to discuss the legal options available to you. Call the Law Offices of Nussin S. Fogel for a free consultation at (800) 734-9338 or (212) 385-1122 to learn your rights.

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