Don’t Settle For Less

Don’t Settle For Less

Archives

Truck Accident in New York City Claims Life of Young Man

| Nov 29, 2019 | Truck Accidents

A young man with a promising future was tragically killed in a fatal truck accident in New York City earlier this month. The 25-year-old aspiring pro wrestler was riding his bicycle near the end of the Willis Avenue Bridge in East Harlem on November 9th when he was struck by a dump truck. The driver left the scene of the crime though it’s not certain whether he knew he struck the cyclist at the time of the accident.

Emergency crews rushed to the scene but the cyclist suffered such severe trauma that they were unable to revive him. Sadly, this is often the case in truck accidents in New York as these vehicles are so heavy that even minor collisions can result in major injuries for cyclists and pedestrians.

Police tracked down the driver of the truck and arrested him for leaving the scene. An investigation into this tragic bicycle accident in Harlem concluded that the truck’s driver had disobeyed a posted sign and made an illegal turn, striking the victim as a result. The NYPD in the past have ticketed several drivers in the same area for making illegal left turns in spite of signs indicating that no left turns were allowed.

This is the 30th fatal bicycle accident in New York City this year-already 20 more than all of last year combined. Thankfully, the NYPD apprehended the driver and the family can feel some form of solace by holding him criminally responsible for their loved one’s tragic death. In addition, the family can sue to hold both the driver and the owner of the truck financially liable for injuries and death of their loved one. The family recover for the victim’s pain and suffering from the time of the accident until his demise and for the amount of money he would have contributed to the household over his work-life expectancy.

If you’ve lost a family member in a bicycle accident in New York City, contact the experienced attorneys at the Law Office of Nussin S. Fogel. Call 800-734-9338 or 212-385-1122 right now.

Archives