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Tragic Subway Accident Results in Horrific Injuries

| Feb 7, 2020 | Subway Accidents

A horrific subway accident in New York City earlier this year resulted in a young woman losing both of her legs. The victim, an Australian tourist, was visiting the city when she tripped at the 14th Street Port Authority Trans-Hudson station and fell on to the tracks. She was then hit by not one but two separate trains. The horrific injuries she suffered resulted in the need for surgeons to amputate both of her legs below the knee in order to save her life. She had lain on the tracks without being seen for approximately 20 minutes before another train pulled into the station and the driver spotted her bright pink shirt.

In documents filed with the court, the victim states that the train-mounted sensors designed to detect obstructions on the tracks were not working. She also alleges that the area in which she fell was visible enough that the driver of the first train which struck her should have been able to see her had they been paying attention.

In addition to losing both her legs, the young woman is also recovering from a severe spinal fracture and head trauma. 

Traumatic injuries like head trauma and amputation have life-long consequences and the costs of rehabilitative care and lost time from work are indeed significant. If she can prove that the sensors could have saved her or that the train operators were negligent for not seeing her and these factors contributed-even in part-to her horrific subway accident in New York, the City of New York and New York City Transit Authority be held liable for her pain and suffering of her injuries, her lost time from work from the time of the accident extending into the future and any out of pocket expenses relating to her injuries.

If you or a loved one has been injured by a train in NYC, contact an experienced subway accident lawyer in New York City today to discuss your case confidentially. Call the Law Offices of Nussin S. Fogel at 800-734-9338 or 212-385-1122 today.

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